Elizabeth M. Johnson

Elizabeth M. Johnson, MA

Trauma Educator 

Elizabeth is a rape survivor, trauma educator, writer and peer support advocate. She helps people understand how sexual abuse affects health and wellness including in intimacy, parenting, dating, perimenopause and reproductive wellness.

Elizabeth has worked with abuse survivors for 15 years including at three different human services agencies. In those capacities, she has coordinated training and education for community partners and volunteers on abuse dynamics, lethality assessment and crisis intervention. Elizabeth has managed a 24 hour domestic violence crisis line, training and overseeing 50 agency volunteers, including students. Elizabeth did her undergraduate work at University of Connecticut in Storrs and holds a Masters of Arts degree in Women’s Studies from Southern Connecticut State University. She lives with her family in Durham, North Carolina.

Elizabeth is currently at work on a book about the power of peer support and finding your right people.

Facebook: https://t.co/6sxGEepxwe
Twitter: @EMJWriting
Instagram: @EMJWriting
LinkedIn: https://t.co/RXnr39idM8

My posts

Instagram

I'm so angry at how poorly women, ESPECIALLY Black women, continue to be treated by their healthcare provider. Here's what that can look like:
.
.
 *Being labeled unfair, projecting or wrong when sharing personal experiences;
 *Exposure to stereotypes (
I'm so angry at how poorly women, ESPECIALLY Black women, continue to be treated by their healthcare provider. Here's what that can look like: . . *Being labeled unfair, projecting or wrong when sharing personal experiences; *Exposure to stereotypes ("what's your drug of choice?") or assumptions about being a drug addict when seeking pain relief; *Being instructed to step on the scale at a WIC appointment for their child; *Weight shaming and/or stating that weight is reason for the health issue, being advised to lose weight; *Repeatedly being asked if they are pregnant or when they are going to stop having babies; *Touch by a provider without consent and/or without stated reason for doing so. . . Shaming anyone for their experience or choices (although I would argue that one's weight is less a "choice" and more an amalgam of experience, genetics, and personal history) is not an effective way to help anyone change or become more healthy. End of story. . . For abuse survivors, however, situations like these go beyond shaming. They can also be re-traumatizing because they re-enact the damaging power and control dynamic that was used against them when they were abused. For Black women specifically, however, these examples are one more way that simply by visiting a healthcare professional they are exposed to implicit bias or what I call racism. . . Your pain matters. Your experience matters. How you are treated as soon as you walk in the motherfucking door, MATTERS. . . Demand 👆🏾better 👆🏾of your providers. And if they cannot become more humane in their interactions with you, you owe it to yourself to find someone who can.💪🏾
When I got the news of Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death on Friday night, I felt crippled by sadness. The world shattered. I cried for a while. The big sobs that you feel like neighbors can hear. Then I went to bed.
.
.
Although we often use the terms
When I got the news of Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death on Friday night, I felt crippled by sadness. The world shattered. I cried for a while. The big sobs that you feel like neighbors can hear. Then I went to bed. . . Although we often use the terms "emotions" and "feelings" interchangeably, they are different. An emotion is a fleeting signal. It pops up (surprise, sadness, anger,etc) and then fades. What remains, or can remain, is a feeling. . . I woke up feeling low and deeply disheartened. The hits keep coming in 2020 and this one was crushing. I tried to keep myself on task of listening to what I was feeling. I did some writing and thinking. Then I shut down for the day to concentrate on where I had to be next. . . Coming home on Saturday, I felt tired in a good way. I kept listening to myself. The grief was still there. I wasn't ready to "fight". So what did I need? I know that emotions are information. They help me tune into what I need. I needed some extra caring. Some tenderness. . . I unpacked a bag left by a sweet friend. Gladware back! 😝A beautiful new mug and some other goodies. 💖What a lovely boost. A long walk with Nestor. Pizza for dinner on the backporch with plenty of fresh air and brightness. . . Sunday was quieter. I skipped working out. Socially distanced chatting with neighbors, a few extra sweets, a long walk with my family. Peanut butter pie making (see my story!), big juicy salad for dinner. Slowness. . . And so it's Monday and I'm still listening even though it's Monday. Monday and all its heaviness is something I am gentling even today. How are you feeling? What are your emotions telling you? What feelings are lingering?
Stephen Wiesenfeld and Paula Polatschek were married in 1970. In 1972, Polatschek died in childbirth, which left Wiesenfeld with the care of their newborn son. Wiesenfeld applied for social security benefits for himself and his son, and was told that his son could receive them but that he could not. Social Security Act provides benefits based on the earnings of a deceased husband and father that are available to both the children and the widow. (1)
.
.
In 1973, Wiesenfeld sued on behalf of himself and similarly situated widowers. He claimed that the relevant section of the Social Security Act unfairly discriminated on the basis of sex and sought summary judgment. Rutgers Law School professor Ruth Bader Ginsburg represented Wiesenfeld, soon to be facing the Supreme Court after a strong of unfavorable Supreme Court decisions on gender discrimination cases. (2)
.
.
Ginsburg made the argument that Section 402(g) of the Social Security Act discriminated against Stephen Wiesenfeld by not providing him with the same survivors' benefits as it would to a widow. Further, Ginsburg argued that Paula's contributions to Social Security were not treated on an equal basis to salaried men, so she was also being discriminated against. (2)
.
.
Ginsburg won.
.
.
Linda Greenhouse of the New York Times says this case was significant in the Court establishing a
Stephen Wiesenfeld and Paula Polatschek were married in 1970. In 1972, Polatschek died in childbirth, which left Wiesenfeld with the care of their newborn son. Wiesenfeld applied for social security benefits for himself and his son, and was told that his son could receive them but that he could not. Social Security Act provides benefits based on the earnings of a deceased husband and father that are available to both the children and the widow. (1) . . In 1973, Wiesenfeld sued on behalf of himself and similarly situated widowers. He claimed that the relevant section of the Social Security Act unfairly discriminated on the basis of sex and sought summary judgment. Rutgers Law School professor Ruth Bader Ginsburg represented Wiesenfeld, soon to be facing the Supreme Court after a strong of unfavorable Supreme Court decisions on gender discrimination cases. (2) . . Ginsburg made the argument that Section 402(g) of the Social Security Act discriminated against Stephen Wiesenfeld by not providing him with the same survivors' benefits as it would to a widow. Further, Ginsburg argued that Paula's contributions to Social Security were not treated on an equal basis to salaried men, so she was also being discriminated against. (2) . . Ginsburg won. . . Linda Greenhouse of the New York Times says this case was significant in the Court establishing a "juris prudence of sex equality,". Ruth Bader Ginsburg took similar equality cases throughout her career until she was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1993. Once on the court Ginsburg was a consensus builder but also firm in her beliefs, influencing cases like VMI being forced to admit women. As the court grew more conservative, Greenhouse says, Giunsburg was not always in a position to "control the outcome of events but she was in position to stake her claim for what the outcome should have been,". (3) . Continued in the comments.